Art Gallery of Windsor Presents Three New Exhibitions This Winter Season

Friday January 20th, 2012

Posted at 10:15am

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The current exhibit The Optimism of Colour – William Perehudoff, a retrospective shows the work of the Saskatchewan painter and is quoted to be  “the most comprehensive survey of his work to date, traces both the single-mindedness and variety of his long evolution, stressing continuities and acknowledging his refusal to settle for known solutions.”

The large scale colour enriched paintings are considerably remarkable and breathe taking. The linear continuum in each painting explores the relationship of colour in parallel with emotion and meaning.   This Prairie artist has exhibited internationally and all throughout Canada. Come take a glance and let your senses guide you.  This exhibit runs until April 1st.

Opening at the Art Gallery today is to new exhibits:

Luanne Martineau
Running from January 21st to March 25th

Montreal artist, Luanne Martineau produces needle-punched felt by piercing dyed raw sheep’s wool fibres over and over again with a long needle. Strands of various colours are entwined and compressed together to create a decidedly painterly effect, while the building up of many layers hardens the felt, resulting in dense, thickly sculptural masses. From Abstract Expressionist painting to the Duchampian ready-made, Martineau juxtaposes specific moments in the historical narratives of art and craft.

This exhibition is curated by Lesley Johnstone, Conservatrice/Curator, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and is organized by Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal in collaboration with the Art Gallery of Windsor

John Kissick: A Nervous Decade
Running from January 21st to March 25th

John Kissick’s work has enjoyed acclaim over the past decade for its viable, if highly critical, dialogue with the historical conventions of abstract painting. Kissick weaves the familiar – such as the supergraphics on 1960s civic architecture and contemporary popular music – into an expansive conversation about quotation and the institutionalization of artistic processes. A Nervous Decade brings together paintings from public and private collections throughout Canada. This exhibition traces Kissick’s early exploration and re-assembly of an abstract expressionist lexicon, through to a current immersion in hybrid painting informed by popular culture.

This exhibition is curated by Crystal Mowry and organized and circulated by the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery in partnership with the Kelowna Art Gallery.

 

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