Heritage Trees Celebrate Windsor’s Connections To The War Of 1812

Monday May 8th, 2017

Posted at 7:58pm

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225 year old Sycamore tree in Windsor was recognized as a Forest Ontario Heritage Tree earlier today. (CNW Group/Forests Ontario)

Two Heritage Trees in Windsor were recognized on Monday.

The first of the two recognized trees is a 225-year-old sycamore located in the Roseland Residential District, which has gone through significant changes in the last 100 years. Before becoming a part of the City of Windsor in 1978, the area was occupied by the Roseland Park Country Club.

Before the development of the site as a golf course and country club in 1926, records show the property having been owned by the McKee and Marantette families, both of whom played key roles in the development of the Town of Sandwich, now part of the City of Windsor. The property would eventually pass through the ownership of members of both families who served in the war of 1812.

Forests Ontario also recognized an ancient Jesuit pear tree on the property of Maison Francois Baby House, a historic residence once owned by prominent local politician Francois Baby. The House, a designated National Historical Site, was used as a headquarters by both American and British Forces during the War of 1812.

This species was introduced into the region by the Jesuits at the beginning of the 18th century, and remain a symbol of the Detroit Region’s French-speaking community, which has committed to preserving the species throughout the region.

“Each tree we recognize this year brings more and more light to Ontario’s history,” says Rob Keen, CEO of Forests Ontario. “Trees connect us and no matter where we live; we value the richness they bring to our community. Each tree, however, has a unique back-story that highlights a piece of history in each community that we share through the Ontario Heritage Tree Program.”

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