OvercastNow
0 °C
32 °F
Chance of RainSun
0 °C
32 °F
Chance of RainMon
4 °C
39 °F
Partly CloudyTue
6 °C
43 °F
Send Us A News Tip

Saturday August 9th, 2014

Posted at 5:50pm

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The 155th Comber Fair took place this past weekend with everything from barns of animals to carnival rides and much, much more.

Bob Hornick, President of the Comber Agricultural Society, has been involved with the Comber Fair for 50 years. He said he’s seen a lot of changes since he’s been a part of the fair.

“Everything changes, the audience changes, what they want to see has changed,” said Hornick. “Years ago we had heavy horse pulling, now we don’t … now we have free wifi, who would have thought of free wifi 50 years ago?”

Hornick said one of the biggest changes is the amount of vendors at the fair over the last few years. They’ve increased the number of rides and decreased the vendors to make it more of a rural family-like experience for everyone who attends the fair.

“We don’t want to be commercial, and if all you’ve got is vendors, then it becomes commercial,” said Hornick. “We were able to get another six or seven rides in and everyone seems to be happier and we’re happy doing it.”

Saturday afternoon featured a children’s family show, alongside Carter Shows carnival and multiple vendors. There was also two Elvis tribute artists and a Boots to Beer night in the Beer Garden.

On Sunday was the demolition derby, which Hornick said is the largest in southwestern Ontario with well over 100 cars.

“We have these beautiful grand stands, we actually made them, they’re permanent,” said Hornick. “We can seat minimum of 3,000 people and when you consider Comber has a population of 650 … we count the dogs to get that number, to get 15,000 people going through here in three days, it’s a big thing.”

The most crucial piece that makes the entire fair a success according to Hornick is the community support. From volunteers, to supplies for the fair, and most of all the people who attend, Hornick said the fair is a big success thanks to all who come out to enjoy it.

“It’s really nice to see a child going and petting a rabbit or something like that. If they come out of Windsor they don’t see that kind of stuff,” said Hornick. “It’s a family event, it’s a community event and it’s our agricultural roots. They always say farmers feed city’s, and it’s true, and our job as an agricultural society is to bring awareness to the urban that they need the rural people and come on our and see how we live.”


Do You Like This Article?