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Thursday February 1st, 2018

Posted at 10:00am

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A building that saw a section of roof and rear walls partially collapse in 2014 could become City of Windsor property.

The set of three buildings located at 1777, 1785 and 1795 University West have sat empty for over ten years and owe the city $543,143 in unpaid taxes and penalties.

A tax sale in 2016 was unsuccessful in selling these buildings and administration is recommending to City Council that the properties be vested in the name of the Municipality and that they be demolished and an attempt made to sell the land.

That recommendation was made after the Chief Building Official and Deputy Chief visited the properties in November and found several serious  issues with them.

This includes ongoing concerns from the 2014 collapse of the rear wall of the building to approximately the midpoint of the building. The collapsed roof has fallen into the building space and has also caused the exterior rear block walls to rotate out of plumb slightly but is being supported by temporary supports. The balance of the roof over this unit shows signs of serious structural distress and a similar large-scale structural collapse is inevitable.

They also found that the building has been subject to weather infiltration through the roof and walls for several years, the flat roof over 1777 University exhibits signs of sagging at the midpoint support and the main floor wood floor joists have various small, moderate and large openings forming through the floor as a result of water infiltration and associated structural failure.

Their report also points out several locations around the buildings that have been compromised by break-ins allowing unauthorized persons to enter the building.

Administration is recommending that following vesting an environmental site assessment  and designated substance report be conducted and the building should be demolished for a total cost of $139,000.

2014 file photo

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