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Wednesday June 26th, 2013

Posted at 10:00am

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As we showed you last week, deer are on the run in the city.

Both the Windsor/Essex County Humane Society and Wings Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre report that they have been receiving very high numbers of calls in the past few weeks regarding deer in urban areas. They say that in nearly all cases the best response is to leave the animal alone and allow it to move away.

Officials say that many people are surprised to learn that deer live in urban areas. Deer are often surviving in fragmented habitats that are not connected to other natural areas. As a result, when they begin to move around they will often find themselves in backyards, parks, or on city streets.

In most cases, if left alone and given time, they will find their way back to more natural areas. Safely tranquilizing and relocating these animals is not possible given the risks to both animals and people, as well as the lack of appropriate remote habitat to move them into and laws restricting wildlife relocation.

When dealing with young fawns, officials remind you to remember that their mothers leave them for very long periods of time to avoid drawing predators to them, and that seeing a young fawn alone does not mean it has been abandoned. It is important to always seek expert advice from experts before approaching to moving a young fawn.

If you see a deer wandering in an urban area do not approach it, and do not try to follow it. Instead leave the area and encourage others nearby to do the same.

If a deer appears to be injured you can contact Wings at 519-736-8172 or the Humane Society at 519-966-5751.

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