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Tuesday November 16th, 2010

Posted at 10:05am

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The buying and selling of long play vinyl records is big business again in the music industry and it’s due to a large extent to the age of its buyers.
“The vinyl resurgence we are seeing is due in part to the fact kids are discovering their parent’s record collections,” said John Ashley, promoter of The Others Guys Record and Collectibles Show held Nov 7.
“Vinyl is cool again and the kids are re-discovering the LP … the beauty of the product … the size and shape of a record and the jacket. The warm analogue sound of an LP and those wonderful pops and clicks … turntables and needles.”
It’s the vinyl record revival and more importantly, the resurrection of analogue sound. Left for dead with the advent of the digital age, vinyl records are selling once again.
“This is not a fad or cycle. Music lovers young and old are being drawn into the historic medium. Teens who once scoffed at their parents record collections are now first in line at events like this,” according to Ashley.
Ron Chalk, of London, ON is the elder vendor on the mobile vinyl entourage. He says he’s been coming to events like this for over 40 years and boasts that he owns over 6,000 jazz records.
“The resurgence of vinyl records seems to be an international phenomenon with sales of LP’s on an increase around the world,” said Chalk. “It’s amazing how many kids are starting to show up at events like this.”
More and more mainstream artists are releasing new material on vinyl and many major record labels are re-issuing classic albums in LP form.
According to Paul Tuch, Director of Neilson/BDS Radio, more than 70,000 vinyl LP’s were sold in Canada in 2010, which is up 83 per cent from 2008.
Among the collectors at the event was Kelly Hoppe, local musician and former member of the band Big Sugar. Hoppe says he grew up listening and collecting vinyl records and likes the fact young people today are re-discovering the lost medium.
“I remember the first 45 I bought,” said Hoppe. It was Sugar Shack by Jimmy Gilmer and the Fireballs.”

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