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Sunday March 29th, 2015

Posted at 10:00am

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Darlene Horn

The Essex Region Conservation Foundation has honoured two recipients with a Conservation Foundation award.   The awards recognized outstanding philanthropic commitment from an individual or family, and from a corporation.

“Since 2012, the Foundation initiated this award recognition program to recognize the overwhelming contributions we have received from our supporters. It is with our great appreciation that we honour those who have chosen to give back in order to create a more sustainable region,” said Richard Wyma, Foundation Executive Director.

The award for Outstanding Individual Contribution for an individual or family was named the Clifford Hatch Award, in memory of Clifford Hatch, who made the largest single contribution to the Essex Region Conservation Foundation in 1995, when he donated his farm and outbuildings.

The Clifford Hatch Conservation Foundation award was presented posthumously to Phil Horn and accepted by his wife Darlene. “This past year, the Horn family has made a legacy gift to the Foundation in recognition of Phil’s commitment to the region, in particular Phil’s interest in trails and natural areas,” said Richard Wyma, Executive Director. In recognition of this donation, the Foundation will name the trail at the Maidstone Conservation Area the Darlene and Phil Horn Nature Trail and host an annual interpretive walk through the Conservation Area.

“Phil possessed a deep sensitivity and reverence for the natural world and is truly missed by those who knew and worked with him.” said Wyma.

The Conservation Award for Outstanding Corporate Contribution was awarded to Jamieson Laboratories for their 10-year, $350,000 donation in support of reforestation in our community. In 2010, Jamieson made a commitment to plant 72,000 trees to reforest 121 acres of agricultural land in the Cedar Creek watershed.

“This plan is the largest single restoration project undertaken by ERCA and includes the planting of over 20 different native varieties of trees and bushes including Burr Oak, Red Maple, and Silky Dogwood,” said Wyma. The agricultural lands, which were created in the 1960s, contain remnant Carolinian woodland and will include a managed as wetland.

“Trees are a symbol of hope and renewal and a beloved icon of the Canadian landscape,” said Mark Hornick, President and CEO, Jamieson. “This initiative offsets approximately 10 years of wood-fibre consumption in all aspects of Jamieson business and will provide a renewable enhancement to our environment for all to enjoy for many years to come.”

Jamieson Laboratories Green Team

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