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Tuesday April 8th, 2014

Posted at 12:00pm

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The WIFF Spring series kicks off on Thursday, April 10th with a celebration of First Nations films at the Capital Theater.

Here is a look at whats playing:

Hi-Ho Mistahey! Director Alanis Obomsawin, Canada 2013 @ 6 pm
For more than 40 years, internationally acclaimed filmmaker and activist Alanis Obomsawin has given voice to Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples. A member of the Abenaki Nation, Obomsawin’s earlier credits include the classics Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance and Incident at Restigouche, documentaries that are vital chronicles of the dismantling of indigenous culture. Hi-Ho Mistahey!, her latest film, chronicles the appalling lack of educational opportunities for Aboriginal children at Attawapiskat, and follows them as they take their demands for better educational funding to the Canadian government and the U.N. Obomsawin gave a candid interview about the film prior to its world premiere at TIFF.


Rhymes for Young Ghouls, Director Jeff Barnaby, Canada 2013 @ 8 pm

Bruce DeMara of The Toronto Star writes that Rhymes for Young Ghouls is “impressive on many fronts,” but especially “in its evocation of the time when native people still lived under the paternalistically despotic rule of the government and its representatives.” Set in the 1970s against the backdrop of the residential schools tragedy, Jeff Barnaby’s much-anticipated debut feature film has received stellar reviews and was voted one of Canada’s top ten feature films of 2013. Premiering at last year’s TIFF, the film was described as “an angry and poetic howl for lost lives, lost opportunities and lost loved ones.” As De Mara points out, “Barnaby doesn’t shy away from portraying the self-indulgently indolent lives of the denizens of the Crow’s Kingdom, people who party hardy as a way to retreat from the tyranny of their existence while struggling to hold on to a culture that is being stripped away with each passing generation.”

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