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Sunday October 28th, 2012

Posted at 1:40pm

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Environment Canada has issued this special weather statement for the Windsor and Essex County region, as well as much of Ontario, as the Twitter-dubbed “Frankenstorm” heads through North America in advance of Halloween:

The remnants of hurricane Sandy will arrive late Monday as a large and powerful post tropical fall storm over Southern Ontario.

It is forecast to track from the Atlantic ocean northwest across the mid Atlantic states towards the Lower Great Lakes.

The Northeastern United States will take the brunt of the storm however, there is also the potential for significant impacts in Southern and Eastern Ontario. Significant rainfall with strong and gusty winds appear likely late Monday into Tuesday.

The storm is expected to weaken later Tuesday and on Halloween, but it will remain cool, damp and may still be somewhat windy for the trick-or-treaters.

A complicating factor is the presence of a stalled front now over Southern Ontario. Moisture-laden post-tropical storms with several rain bands interacting with fronts can produce significant rainfall.

Persistent rain is forecast near this front for today and Monday leading up to the arrival of Sandy. It may amount to 10 to 30 mm over this period, especially across Niagara, southcentral Ontario and north to Georgian Bay.

An additional 30 to 50 mm is expected with Sandy. Latest indications suggest that locally higher rain amounts of 50 to 100 mm are possible mainly southeast of a line from St Thomas to Burlington, and perhaps in some areas near the Niagara Escarpment. However the exact location of the heaviest rainfall areas is not yet certain.

The forecast track would also produce widespread 50 to 70 km/h strong winds across Southern Ontario beginning late Monday with severe gusts to 100 km/h likely.

Gale to storm force winds are expected on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. The combination of sodden ground, strong winds and some residual leaves on trees will likely lead to areas with power outages due to fallen limbs or downed trees snapping power lines.

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